Gardening Calendar

Thanks to Johnson County Extension for creating this calendar.

January Garden Calendar

 Vegetables and Fruits

  • Pick up and discard fallen fruit before spring arrives.
  • As nursery catalogs begin to arrive, look for plants with improved insect and disease resistance.
  • Order fruit trees

Flowers

  • Peruse seed catalogs and prepare your seed order.
  • Things you can start: For spring flowers, get unplanted spring bulbs in the ground as soon as possible.
  • Start seeds throughout the winter, depending on growing requirements.
  • Water fall planted perennials to prevent dry soil conditions.
  • Watch for signs of frost heaving and cover tender roots.
  • Replace mulch layers.
  • Check bulbs in storage for rot and decay. Discard damaged ones.
  • Curl up with a good book and learn more about gardening.

Lawns

  • Avoid walking on frozen lawns. It may injure the grass.
  • Rake fallen leaves that pile up on the lawn to prevent suffocation of grass.
  • Scatter snow instead of piling it up on the lawn next to drives and walks.

Trees and Shrubs

  • Snow and ice on limbs:
    • Gently brush heavy snow from tree and shrub limbs to reduce damage.
    • Allow ice to melt naturally from limbs. Do not use water to melt the ice or attempt to knock it off.
  • Pruning:
    • Prune storm damaged limbs quickly to reduce damage and prevent tearing of the bark.
    • Avoid the temptation to prune on warm winter day. You’ll prevent further damage.
    • Bring twigs of flowering trees and shrubs indoors to force blossoms.
    • Water fall planted trees and shrubs when soil is dry but not frozen.
    • Watch out for rabbit damage to the bark of trees and shrubs.

Miscellaneous

  • Clean and repair garden tools during the winter.
  • Sand and seal tool handles to prevent splinters. Apply brightly colored paint to handles. It makes them easier to spot in the garden.
  • Keep bird feeders and water supplies filled for the feathered friends.
  • Evaluate the garden and make notes to assist in next year’s planning.
  • Take photos of the garden and analyze for year-round interest.

February Garden Calendar

Vegetables and Fruits

  • Draw garden layouts to assist with the planning process.
  • Review garden notes about successes and failure in the garden.
  • Order seeds for spring planting.
  • Select varieties and order new fruit trees.
  • Take a soil test if one has not been done the last five years.
  • Start broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage transplants.
  • Prune: 
    • Fruit trees like apples, pears and cherries.
    • Peach and nectarines just prior to bloom time.
    • Grapes, raspberries, and blackberries.
  • Incorporate manure or compost into garden areas for soil improvement.
  • Avoid working the soil when it is wet.
  • Check dates on stored seed packets. Sprout a few from each packet in a moist paper towel. Discard packets with poor results.

Flowers

  • Start seeds for transplanting in the spring.
  • Check fall planted perennials and water if needed.
  • Watch for frost heaving of tender perennials and cover if needed.
  • Replenish winter mulch around roses and other plants.
  • Check bulbs in storage and discard if rotted.
  • Prepare catalog orders.

Lawns

  • To prevent lawn suffocation, rake fallen leaves.
  • Review lawn service contracts and make changes.
  • Tune up and repair the mower to get a jump on the season.
  • Avoid injury to the lawn when the soil is frozen by keeping foot traffic to a minimum.

Trees and Shrubs

  • Check for rabbit damage on young trees and shrubs.
  • Water fall planted trees, shrubs, and evergreens if the soil is dry and not frozen.
  • Apply dormant oil for control of scale and mites.
  • Prune: 
    • Begin spring pruning. However, do not prune spring flowering trees and shrubs until after bloom.
    • Cut twigs and branches of spring shrubs and bring them indoors to add a splash of spring color.
  • Carefully remove snow from limbs with a broom.
  • On warm days, prepare garden soil for early planting.

Houseplants

  • Check plants for insects, mites or other problems and treat as needed.
  • Withhold fertilization until spring arrives.
  • Remove dust build up on plants by placing in the shower and washing off.
  • Water as needed, avoid letting roots set in water.
  • Keep plants out of hot or cold drafts.
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March Garden Calendar

Vegetables and Fruits

  • Prepare soil for spring planting.
  • It is best to perform a soil test before fertilizing to determine needs. If there are no soil test results, fertilize the garden with 1 to 2 pounds of 10-10-10 per 100 square feet.
  • Plant:
  • Potatoes, peas, onions, lettuce and other salad crops.
  • Asparagus, rhubarb, and strawberries.
  • Broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage in late March.
  • Start seeds inside for tomatoes, peppers, and other warm season vegetables.
  • Apply dormant oil to fruit plantings to reduce scale and mite insects.
  • Make a fungicide application to control peach leaf curl.
  • Finish pruning fruit trees, grapes, raspberries, and blackberries.
  • Remove mulch from strawberries when growth begins.

Flowers

  • Plant pansies, snapdragons, calendulas, and other cool-loving annuals.
  • Clean up the perennial bed by cutting back foliage and removing winter mulch layer. Divide and plant perennials in the garden.
  • If dry, prepare soil for planting by adding compost or other organic matter.
  • As growth begins, fertilize gardens with a balanced fertilizer.
  • Start seeds indoors under lights for transplanting to the garden.
  • Plant new roses. Remove winter mulch from existing roses and prune.
  • Cut ornamental grasses back to within 3 to 5 inches of the ground.
  • Fertilize spring flowering bulbs such as tulips and daffodils.
  • Cut seed pods from spent bulbs.
  • Help control iris borers by destroying old foliage before new growth begins.
  • Unwrap mail order plants immediately and keep them cool and moist until planting.

Lawns

  • Spot spray for dandelions, henbit and chickweed.
  • Apply crabgrass preventer in late March through mid-April for best results.
  • Seed thin areas in bluegrass and tall fescue lawns.
  • If no fall application of fertilizer was made, fertilize bluegrass and tall fescue.
  • Mow grass ½ inch lower to remove winter debris. Do not scalp.

Trees and Shrubs

  • Pruning:
    • Prune trees, except birch, maple, and walnut, which are best pruned after leafing out.
    • Wait to prune spring flowering shrubs until after they bloom.
  • Mulch tree and shrub plantings up to 4 inches deep, keeping mulch away from trunks.
  • Fertilize trees and shrubs.
  • Plant new trees in the landscape.
  • Remove tree wraps from young trees for summer growth.
  • Rake and clean groundcover plantings.

Miscellaneous

  • Sharpen and repair garden tools.

April Garden Calendar

Vegetables and Fruits

  • Start fruit tree spray schedule when growth begins
  • Plant carrots, onions, beets and other salad crops in early April
  • Thin radishes, beets and carrots as needed
  • Harvest asparagus until spear size decreases.
  • Prune fruit trees if not already done
  • Plant new fruit trees
  • Plant asparagus and rhubarb
  • Remove mulch from strawberry bed
  • Prune raspberry and blackberry plantings
  • Do not spray insecticides while fruits flower in order to protect the honeybees
  • Plant beans, corn, vine crops in late April
  • Cultivate to control seedling weed growth
  • Turn the compost pile after a long winter rest
  • Transplant broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage in the garden
  • Fertilize vegetable garden before planting and incorporate

Flowers

  • Remove winter mulch from perennial garden
  • Cut back last year’s growth from perennials
  • Remove seed heads from spring bulbs
  • Do not remove foliage from spring flowering bulbs as growth is needed for next year’s flowers
  • Fertilize spring flowering bulbs
  • Add organic matter such as compost before planting new flowers
  • Divide perennials
  • Plant new roses
  • Prune rose bushes
  • Fertilize rose bushes for spring growth
  • Plant annuals from seed and transplants

Lawns

  • Apply crabgrass control by mid month
  • Mow lawn as needed, bluegrass 2″, tall fescue 3″
  • Fertilize cool season lawns with slow release nitrogen fertilizer
  • Do not fertilize zoysia this early in spring, nutrients go to weeds not dormant grass
  • Spot treat broadleaf weeds such as dandelions, henbit, and chickweed
  • Check mower and make needed repairs before season begins
  • Sharpen mower blade
  • No need to catch grass clippings if mowing frequently
  • Do not water unless extremely dry, early irrigation sets turf up as high water user in summer

Trees and Shrubs

  • Prune spring flowering shrubs such forsythia and lilac after flowering
  • Prune trees as needed, and repair winter storm damage
  • Topping is not pruning, never top a tree
  • Plant new trees and shrubs
  • Remove grass from base of young trees and shrubs to prevent lawn mower and line trimmer damage
  • Apply mulch layer around plants
  • Keep new trees and shrubs watered
  • Fertilize young trees to promote growth

House Plants

  • Remove winter dust from leaves by gently rinsing with room temperature water 
  • Repot as needed, increase pot size by 1″
  • Leach excess fertilizers from soil with water
  • Begin summer fertilization of plants
  • Do not move plants outside until night temperatures remain over 60 degrees
  • Propagate house plants by cuttings or divisions
  • Fertilize amaryllis and keep in bright light to encourage new leaves

May Garden Calendar

Vegetables and Fruits

  • Plant tomato, pepper, and eggplant transplants in early May
  • Seed sweet corn, cucumbers, squash, beans, and other warm season vegetables
  • Lightly cultivate soil with a hoe to control weed growth
  • Mound soil around potato plants to encourage tuber formation
  • Harvest fresh asparagus until the spear size decreases
  • Remove rhubarb seed stalks to encourage leaf growth
  • Plant kitchen herbs for summer use in dishes or food preservation
  • Treat fruit trees with needed pesticides to control insects and disease
  • Thin heavy fruit set on apples to increase fruit size and next year’s crop

Flowers

  • Plant annual flowers for summer color
  • Continue to plant and divide perennials
  • Mulch perennial and annual gardens for weed control and moisture retention
  • Begin pinching chrysanthemums for bushier plants
  • Do not remove foliage from spring bulbs until it dies down naturally, this develops stronger blooms for next year
  • Plant container gardens and hanging baskets using a good quality potting mix
  • Keep a garden journal for permanent reference

Lawns

  • Reduce thatch layers from zoysia by verticutting or core aerating
  • Sod or sprig zoysia lawns to fill in bare areas
  • Fertilize zoysia lawns with high nitrogen to promote green up and summer growth
  • Mow zoysia at 1 to 2 inches tall
  • Apply slow release nitrogen fertilizer to bluegrass and tall fescue to promote summer growth if watering during the summer. Lower maintenance lawns skip this application
  • Mow bluegrass and tall fescue at 3 inches
  • Spot treat broadleaf weeds
  • Withhold early summer watering until needed to promote more drought tolerant lawns

Trees and Shrubs

  • Plant new trees and shrubs
  • Prune spring flowering shrubs after bloom to shape plant and encourage flowers next year
  • Mulch around young trees and shrubs to conserve moisture and control weed growth
  • Water young ornamentals as needed
  • Remove tree wraps for summer growth
  • Remove tree stakes that have been in place more than one growing season
  • Fertilize trees to help increase growth rates
  • Caution, use line trimmers around trees and shrubs so as not to damage tender bark

Houseplants

  • Move plants outdoors for summer by gradually increasing the exposure to sunlight
  • Fertilize plants to promote summer development
  • Rotate plants to develop a well-rounded plant
  • Wash dusty leaves in the shower under room temperature water
  • Four to six inch cuttings are a great way to start new plants, root in potting mix under low light
  • Repot plants into a one inch larger pot
  • Check for insects

June Garden Calendar

Vegetables and Fruits

  • Renovate June bearing strawberry beds
  • Fertilize strawberries and water regularly to promote new growth
  • Plant another crop of sweet corn and green beans
  • Watch tomatoes for foliar leaf disease development and treat
  • Mulch crops for moisture conservation and weed control
  • Continue a regular fruit disease and insect control program
  • Treat peach trees for trunk borers
  • Remove sucker growth from base of trees and along branches
  • Pinch herbs to keep bushy and fresh with new growth
  • Turn compost pile and keep moist for a quicker breakdown

Flowers

  • Pinch chrysanthemums for development of a bushy plant
  • Deadhead spent flower blossoms to keep plant flowering
  • Remove flower stalks from peonies and iris
  • Mulch flower gardens for the summer to conserve moisture, control weeds and cool the soil
  • Water plants as needed
  • Fertilize roses with about 1 cup of low analysis fertilizer per plant
  • Trim spent rose blossoms
  • Check plants for insects
  • Remove dead foliage from spring bulbs
  • Water and fertilize container plantings regularly to encourage growth and flowering

Lawns

  • Raise mowing height on bluegrass and tall fescue to 3″ or 3 ½” for summer heat resistance
  • Fertilize zoysia lawns with high nitrogen fertilizer such as 27-3-3
  • Sod or plug bare areas in zoysia lawns
  • Spot treat for broadleaf weeds
  • Core aerate zoysia lawns for removal of thatch and overall vigor
  • Let grass clippings fall for nutrient recycling
  • Water the turf sparingly to increase drought tolerance during heat of summer. Let turf wilt between watering for best results
  • Check mower blade for sharpness and sharpen as needed
  • Check lawn mower engine oil and add or change according to owners’ manual

Trees and Shrubs

  • Check for bagworms and control as needed
  • Mulch around the bases of trees and shrubs to conserve moisture
  • Prune pines and spruces to shape and control size
  • Water newly planted trees and shrubs as needed
  • Prune spring flowering shrubs
  • Do not damage tree trunks with mowers and weed whips
  • Check for spider mite damage on various shrubs
  • Clip hedges as needed to maintain shape

Houseplants

  • Fertilize throughout the summer months to encourage growth
  • Wash leaves to remove dust
  • Take cuttings to start new plants
  • Prune and shape plants for added beauty
  • Repot plants as needed in 1″ larger containers
  • Check for insect problems

July Garden Calendar

Vegetables and Fruits

  • Harvest fruits of your labor and enjoy
  • Control weed growth to preserve water and nutrients
  • Fertilize vegetables to encourage plant development
  • Watch for foliar disease development on lower tomato leaves and treat with a fungicide
  • Prepare for fall gardening. Plant potatoes, broccoli, and other fall crops
  • Spray sweet corn to control corn earworms as silks emerge
  • Be on the lookout for pests of the garden and control
  • Remove old raspberry canes after harvest

Flowers

  • Remove faded flowers from annuals to stimulate more flowers for late summer color, and from perennials to prevent reseeding
  • Keep gardens well mulched
  • Cut fresh bouquets for enjoyment on hot summer days
  • Lightly fertilize annuals to promote growth
  • Dig, divide, and replant crowded irises
  • Fertilize roses for fall blossoms
  • Fertilize and water container gardens
  • Complete the final pinching of chrysanthemum tips for bushier plants

Lawns

  • Mow bluegrass and tall fescue around 3 to 3 1/2 inches
  • Mow zoysia at 1 1/2 inches
  • Fertilize zoysia to encourage summer growth with a high nitrogen fertilizer. Let grass clippings fall to return nutrients to soil and grass
  • Be on the lookout for summer diseases such as brown patch
  • Watch for grubs. If they begin to hatch, an insecticide may be required. Apply in late July or early August.
  • Keep mower blades sharpened
  • Replace lawn mower air filter and change lawn mower oil per owner’s manual
  • Prepare to control perennial grassy weeds such as zoysia, fescue, and nimblewill
  • Take a soil test to prepare for fall lawn renovation
  • Water deeply and less often for deep roots and a healthy lawn

Trees and Shrubs

  • Water newly planted shrubs and young trees (planted within the last three to five years) during dry weather
  • Keep plants mulched to conserve moisture and cool roots
  • Remove sucker growth from the base of trees and along branches
  • Prune diseased, dead, or hazardous limbs

Miscellaneous

  • Water weekly by deeply soaking the soil. Use surface irrigation and avoid watering late at night to help reduce disease development.
  • Take photos of gardens

August Garden Calendar

Vegetables and Fruits

  • Water about 1 inch per week
  • Plant a fall garden, beets, carrots, beans, and turnips for autumn harvest
  • Plant transplants of broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage for fall production
  • Harvest crops on a regular basis for season long production
  • Ease fruit loads on branches by propping with wooden supports
  • Net ripening fruit to protect from hungry birds
  • Fertilize strawberry bed for added flower bud development
  • Turn compost pile and add water when dry

Flowers

  • Apply 1 to 1 ½ inches of water per week to gardens
  • Divide irises and daylilies during this dormant period
  • Make last application of fertilizer to roses by mid month
  • Control black spot and other rose diseases
  • Fertilize mums, hardy asters, and other fall blooming perennials
  • Deadhead annuals to encourage late season blossoms
  • Cut back and fertilize annuals to produce new growth and fall blooms
  • Sow hollyhocks, poppies, and larkspur for spring blooms
  • Prepare for fall bulb planting by making orders or researching varieties
  • Take cuttings from geraniums and begonias for wintering indoors

Lawns

  • Water bluegrass one to two times, per week, applying a total of about 1 ½ inches of water
  • Water tall fescue one to two times, per week, applying a total of 1 inch of water
  • Apply last application of fertilizer to zoysia by mid month
  • Be on the look out for grubs and apply proper control methods
  • Start planning for fall renovation projects such as aerating and seeding
  • Check sharpness of mower blades and repair
  • Mow turf as needed depending on summer growth
  • Destroy unwanted zoysia and Bermuda grass
  • Take a soil test to determine a fertility program

Trees and Shrubs

  • Water young trees every 1 to 2 weeks by thoroughly soaking the root system
  • Prune and shape hedges
  • Check mulch layers and add if needed
  • Prune broken, dead or crossing limbs for healthier plants
  • Check young trees and shrubs for girdling wires, and ropes from planting
  • Avoid fertilizing ornamentals now so they harden off before winter
  • Hand remove bagworms

Houseplants

  • Water houseplants regularly and fertilize to promote growth
  • Check plants for insects such as scales, aphids, and spider mites
  • Wash plants to remove dust layers
  • Make cuttings and repot plants before summer sun slips away

September Garden Calendar

Vegetables and Fruits

  • Continue to harvest vegetables
  • Pick apples and pears and store in a cool place to extend freshness
  • Harvest pumpkins when flesh is completely orange and avoid carrying by stem
  • Harvest winter squash when rind is hard enough to puncture with fingernail
  • Plant lettuce, spinach, and radishes
  • Remove weeds from garden plantings before going to seed
  • Herbs can be dug from garden and placed in pots for indoor use this winter
  • Remove small tomatoes from their vines to increase late development of more mature fruits

Flowers

  • Plant spring flowering bulbs, tulips, daffodils, and others
  • Dig, divide, or plant peonies
  • Divide perennials, especially spring bloomers
  • Remove seedheads from perennials to prevent reseeding in the garden
  • Plant chrysanthemums for fall color
  • Dig gladiolus as foliage begins to yellow and air dry before storing for winter
  • Clean up garden areas to reduce insects and disease as plants dieback for winter
  • Enrich soil by adding organic matter such as peat moss or compost

Lawns

  • Plant or sod new bluegrass or tall fescue lawns
  • Renovate bluegrass or tall fescue lawns by verticutting
  • Core aerate cool season turf
  • Fertilize cool season grasses with high nitrogen sources of fertilizer
  • Mow turf at 2 to 3 inches and sharpen blade for a clean cut

Trees and Shrubs

  • Plant trees and shrubs, deciduous and evergreen
  • Rake up fallen leaves and compost
  • Prune broken and dead branches from trees
  • Avoid pruning spring flowering shrubs such as lilac and forsythia to ensure spring flowers
  • Hand pick bagworms to reduce problem in future

Houseplants

  • Bring plants in before temperatures drop into the fifties
  • Clean and wash before moving indoors to reduce insects
  • Fertilize before winter conditions arrive and growth slows
  • Poinsettias can be forced into Christmas bloom by starting dark treatment of short days

October Garden Calendar

Vegetables and Fruits

  • Plant garlic cloves for next summer’s harvest. Fall planting gets a jump on spring conditions.
  • After a light frost, dig sweet potatoes and cure them for two weeks in a warm location. Then store in a cool, dry location for longer keeping.
  • Harvest peanuts and roast for a homegrown snack.
  • Pick pumpkins and winter squash. Keep in a warm area for a couple of weeks, and then store in a cool, dry location.
  • Till the garden at the end of the season and add organic matter such as manure or compost to improve the soil structure.
  • Make notes of successes and failures in the garden for next year.
  • Remove hulls from black walnuts to retain good color of the kernels.
  • Continue to harvest apples.
  • Pick up and discard fallen fruit to reduce disease next year.

Flowers

  • Plant spring flowering bulbs, such as tulips, daffodils, and crocus, for a splash of early season color.
  • Remove dead annuals from the garden.
  • Trim perennial stalks to tidy the garden for winter.
  • Pot bulbs for indoor forcing.
  • Clean up dead iris and peony foliage and destroy it to decrease the spread of disease.
  • After a light frost, dig canna, glads, dahlias and other tender bulbs for winter storage.
  • Make notes about the garden to document successes and failures.

Lawns

  • Continue to mow the lawn if necessary, bluegrass 2 inches, tall fescue 2½ inches.
  • Core aerate turf to reduce soil compaction, improve drainage, break up thatch, and help nutrients move into the soil.
  • Control dandelions, henbit, and chickweed with a broadleaf herbicide while seedlings are young.
  • Sharpen mower blade for a clean cut.
  • Check oil level in your lawn mower.
  • Keep fallen leaves removed from the lawn to prevent shading and dieback on grass.

Trees and Shrubs

  • Plant new trees and shrubs and keep them watered during dry winter months.
  • Once the leaves have fallen, transplant trees and shrubs.
  • Trim dead, broken, or diseased branches from trees and shrubs.
  • Enjoy fall leaf color, which normally hits its peak about the third week of October.

Miscellaneous

  • Drain and store garden hoses and sprinklers for winter.
  • Prepare the compost pile for winter. Add new materials and turn.
  • Store unused seeds in a cool, dry location.

November Garden Calendar

Vegetables and Fruits

  • Sort apples in storage and remove spoiled fruit.
  • Clean and remove fallen fruit from around trees to reduce insects and disease next year.
  • Protect trunks of fruit trees from rabbit damage with tree wraps.
  • Take a soil test and make needed adjustments this fall.
  • Till garden soil and add organic matter.

Flowers

  • Clean up the rose bed to help reduce disease next season. Cut back tall rose canes to 24 inches to prevent winter breakage.
  • Remove frost-killed annuals.
  • Till annual flower beds and add organic matter to improve soil.
  • Continue to plant spring flowering bulbs.
  • Depending on your gardening style, leave or cut back perennial stalks to 4 to 6 inches.
  • Apply a winter mulch to perennials and roses after several hard freezes.

Lawns

  • Rake fallen leaves from the lawn to prevent winter suffocation.
  • Video: Tired of Raking? Try Mulch Mowing
  • Fertilize cool season lawns, bluegrass and tall fescue, with a quick-release high-nitrogen fertilizer to promote root development and early spring green up.
  • If needed, water turf so it starts winter with ample moisture.
  • Control dandelions, henbit, and chickweed before spring green up.
  • Continue to mow into the fall at 2 to 3 inches.

Trees and Shrubs

  • Water newly planted trees and shrubs.
  • Plant new trees and shrubs.
  • Video: How to Plant a Tree
  • Rake leaves and place in compost pile.
  • Check mulch layers and replenish.
  • Prune dead or hazardous limbs.
  • Wait to prune spring flowering trees and shrubs until after bloom.

Miscellaneous

  • Clean and oil garden tools, sprayers, and other equipment. Store them for winter.
  • Drain garden hoses and sprinklers and store indoors for increased life. If you decide to leave them outside, unscrew them from the faucets.
  • If fuel is to remain in power equipment, add fuel stabilizer. Otherwise, drain gas from power equipment for winter storage. Make any needed repairs.
  • Protect ornamental and fruit trees and young plants from rabbit damage by wrapping or enclosing in wire screen.
  • Start a compost pile with fall leaves.
  • Turn compost pile to hasten breakdown.
  • Start planning for next year.

December Garden Calendar

Vegetables and Fruits

  • Store leftover seeds and a cool, dry location, for example, in a sealed jar placed in the refrigerator.
  • Check vegetables in storage for spoilage.
  • Mulch strawberries for winter protection.
  • Clean and oil garden hand tools for winter.

Flowers

  • Mulch roses by mounding soil 6 to 8 inches deep over the plants to protect the graft.
  • Mulch perennial beds with 2 to 4 inches of straw, shredded leaves, or other lightweight material.
  • Cut tall hybrid tea roses back to 18 to 24 inches to reduce wind whipping and plant damage.
  • Continue to plant spring flowering bulbs until the ground is frozen. Water and mulch.
  • Give plants or gift certificates as holiday gifts for gardening friends.
  • Empty decorative pots and containers. Store inside or decorate for winter.

Lawns

  • Pick up fallen leaves, limbs, and other debris from lawn to prevent suffocation of the turf during winter.
  • Store any left over lawn fertilizers in dry location and out of reach of children and pets.
  • Store pesticides in a cool (not freezing) dry location for winter, out of reach of children and pets.

Trees and Shrubs

  • Keep heavy snowfall from limbs of trees and shrubs by lightly shaking to avoid damage.
  • To prevent breakage, avoid shoveling snow onto trees and shrubs.
  • Check and protect the trunks of young trees and branches of shrubs for rabbit damage.
  • Living Christmas trees are special. Leave in your home no longer than one week, then acclimate to outdoors and plant in a desirable location.
  • Prune damaged branches throughout the winter months.
  • Water newly planted trees and shrubs in winter to prevent dry soil conditions.
  • Mulch roots of tender shrubs such as azaleas and rhododendrons to keep vigorous during winter.
  • Prune branches of junipers, pines, hollies, and other plants to use as holiday decorations.

Miscellaneous

  • Start planning for next year by making notes and preparing orders.
  • Turn compost pile to encourage winter breakdown.

Average Frost Free Dates for Johnson County, Kansas

Spring Percentage Chance of Frost
(32 degrees F)
Dates
50/50 ChanceApril 15 (Average last frost date)
40%April 18
30%April 21
20%April 25
10%April 30
5%May 4
1%May 13
  • Earliest date of last frost was March 15, 1910.
  • Latest date of last frost was May 14, 1914.

Fall

Percentage Chance of Frost
(32 degrees F)
Dates
50/50 ChanceOctober 23 (Average first frost date)
40%October 20
30%October 17
20%October 13
10%October 9
5%October 5
1%September 29
  • Earliest date of first frost was September 24, 1942.
  • Latest date of first frost was November 11, 1946.